Wednesday, December 10, 2014

The Top Five: Best Writing-Related Articles from December 1-5

With apologies to my readers for my being out of state over the weekend and away from all Internet access until today ...

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5. "How to Write Better Articles" on LinkedIn (David Gargaro)

Link: http://linkd.in/1sbMgDY

LinkedIn's new option for members to post content to a running feed of articles is a fantastic opportunity to get your ideas out there in front of an appreciative audience. That aside, this post is quick and concise, with five simple (but often overlooked) ways to improve your article writing. Which tip (or reminder, if you've heard it before) is most useful for you at this stage in your work? Why?

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4. "How To Tips for Writing & Optimizing Your LinkedIn Profile" on Rocks Digital (Debra Jason)

Link: http://bit.ly/1shFSoY

It's always worthwhile to be reminded how to best convey our personal selves, our brand, what we stand for, in Internet profiles, especially where LinkedIn (with so many professional networking opportunities) is concerned. What keywords are affiliated with your industry that you haven't yet used in your profile? How can you incorporate them?

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3. "Gestation of Ideas: On Vertical Writing and Living" on The Millions (Nick Ripatrazone)

Link: http://bit.ly/1y7HBEr

This essay on author Andre Dubus relates his intriguing perspective on ideas for writing and the writing process itself, even unto an almost psychological method with which to flesh out the story line and characters as he works.

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2. "Get More Traffic by Adding 'Tweetables' to Your Blog Posts" on Michelle Schaeffer

Link: http://bit.ly/1wcbGR6

I know you've seen the highlighted lines and phrases in blog posts and web articles these days: "Click here to Tweet!" is the message. With this informative post, you can create your own "Tweetables" and encourage readers to share your work with other potentially interested parties. It's user-friendly and intuitive to do (even for those of us who aren't as technologically-savvy as up-and-coming generations).

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1. "Query Letter Pet Peeves -- Agents Speak" on Writers in the Storm Blog (Chuck Sambuchino)

Link: http://bit.ly/RYoo55

Author, blogger, Writer's Digest Books editor, and freelance editor Chuck Sambuchino compiled an invaluable list of comments from literary agents. The topic? How NOT to query an agent with your current project. We've all been to conferences to hear what agents want to read in the query letter, but this post takes the question one step further to the opposite extreme, for those of us who live life on the edge, or just prefer to do what everyone else isn't doing. Which guideline did you most need to hear, and why?

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There is the lineup for last week, with my continued apologies for its tardiness. Let me know what you found most helpful, or least helpful.

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