Monday, November 10, 2014

The Top Five: Best Writing-Related Articles from November 3-7

5. "SSH! Clandestine Secrets for Writing Suspense!" on Uncommon YA (Kym Brunner)

Link: http://bit.ly/1uannqJ

Don't let the host site turn you away. If you write thrillers, mysteries, or suspense novels --- and there's a good case to be made that you might be writing one even if you think you're writing romance or adventure (see #4 below) --- this post is for you. Find five fantastic guidelines for putting together a novel that will keep your reader engaged from start to finish.

Which secret for writing suspense do you find most helpful to your situation? Which one had you already heard before? What can you do in your novel to introduce more suspense?

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4. "Don't Knock Thrillers" on Huffington Post (Mark Rubinstein)

Link: http://huff.to/1xb0bep

How do you define a thriller (as opposed to, say, an adventure, or a mystery)? The answer put forth in this post might surprise you. Rubinstein suggests that even Shakespeare wrote thrillers, according to a certain set of criteria. Find out if you're writing a thriller and didn't realize it!

What do you think? Could any genre be categorized as a "thriller" in some ways? Why or why not?

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3. "Can You Write a Novel in a Month? Sure! Just Follow These Tips From Boston Writers" on Boston.com (Maura Johnston)

Link: http://bit.ly/1xm2ARQ

If you haven't started a novel for NaNoWriMo (National Novel-Writing Month) for November, it isn't too late. Some participants write the bulk of their 50,000-word goal in just a few days or over a long weekend, given enough determination, commitment, and coffee (or chocolate). This post includes recommendations from four different published authors about how to follow through on your writing commitments and get the job done.

Which author's advice did you appreciate most? Why?

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2. "Six Ways to Write Your Title" on Always Write (David Leonhardt)

Link: http://bit.ly/1x8DG8f

If you're like me, you hate writing titles. There's something about having to summarize the content of your manuscript or poem or essay in a single word or phrase that drives me crazy. How am I supposed to put the essence of a 100,000-word novel into just three or four words? What kinds of titles make the most impact on a potential reader? It's a lot to think about. I bookmarked this brilliant post for future reference --- I hope never to have to struggle with writing a title again!

What about you? Do you have a hard time writing titles, or do they come to you easily?

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1. "Reading a Poem: 20 Strategies" on The Atlantic (Mark Yakich)

Link: http://theatln.tc/1vzxTEq

Some of us remember slogging through poem after poem in a high school or college literature class and mentally fortifying ourselves with the thought that we just had to survive long enough to pass the class. While an admirable sentiment, that's a depressing way to look at poetry. Yakich's post gives you twenty new ways to approach a poem so you can read it like you're reading poetry for the very first time --- with wonderment and curiosity, open to whatever the poem might teach you.

What's your favorite poem? How do you like to enjoy poetry? What other ways do you approach reading poetry that Yakich didn't mention?

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There's the list for last week. Let me know if I missed out on another post or article that was really insightful for your writing (or blogging, or freelancing). Which article was most helpful for you this time around?

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