Monday, October 6, 2014

The Top Five: Best Writing-Related Articles from September 29-October 3

5. "The Ten Most Valuable Writing Tips I've Received" on Suffolk Scribblings (Dylan Hearn)

Link: http://bit.ly/1n3vJiz

Age-old advice and wisdom that writers have been saying and hearing (and, sometimes, ignoring or forgetting) for decades or centuries. It's said that you have to hear something three times before it sticks in your mind. I think with writers, sometimes it's more like six or ten or thirty or a hundred times before something sticks, because you need to be in the right frame of mind, standing in the correct context, feeling the right feeling, before it actually clings to you.

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4. "10 Gorgeous Quotes from Banned Books [IMAGES]" on Huffington Post Books (Carina Kolodny)

Link: http://huff.to/1qWPPvH

Sometimes a banned book is banned for the best reasons people can think of for banning a book in that particular era or venue (library, school, whatever). Banning books is subjective, though, just as is anything in life when you declare your own opinion or position about something. Some of the books banned most often remain classics in every sense of the word and continue to be read in literature classes. Which banned books have you read recently?

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3. "The Recipe for Writing Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror" on BTS eMag LLC (Sonny Whitelaw)

Link: http://bit.ly/Z1DNoC

I don't know how I feel about formulas for writing fiction, or anything, for that matter. If you're writing structured poetry, it's different to an extent because you have prescribed parameters (metric feet, syllables, rhymes, rhythm) to follow. With fiction, on the other hand ... there's subjectivity (see #4 above). This post is thought-provoking and thorough, at the least. What do you think?

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2. "How to Properly Write a Negative Review" on The Steadfast Reader (April)

Link: http://bit.ly/1pSdYh1

Crucial tips to keep in mind when you're reviewing a book or a movie or a poem or anything else created, produced, written, designed, or drafted by somebody else. Negative reviews exist by default to prove the positive reviews correct, but that doesn't mean a negative review needs to tear apart the author or artist or poet in question. One of the best tips to remember is to focus on the content, not the creator, in the review. Read this post for the rest. I've bookmarked it!

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1. "Genre-Crossing Authors: An Interview With One Who Does It Well" on Book Riot (Jeremy Anderberg)

Link: http://bit.ly/1yEtJ5n

I'm a fan of what I can learn from other authors and artists, as might by now be obvious. In this interview with Marcus Brotherton, the term "genre-crossing" does not mean that the author wrote a book in which he fused two opposite genres (romance and horror, for instance). It means that he's well-established as a nonfiction author and tried his hand at a work of fiction. How many of us haven't thought before about dabbling in other genres?

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What articles did I miss out on this week? Which was most helpful to you? Least helpful?

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